Biographies number :
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Gino Vannelli's biographies :
1 : BIOGRAPHY from RCA red seal Victor, USA written in 2003 :
The breakthrough.

When an artist's passion, desire, vision and pure musical ability all converge at that
unspeakable vanishing point on the horizon, that's when it happens. It’s that rare
musical moment when expression is driven solely by the pure love of the song.

For Gino Vannelli, that breakthrough came with his newest album, Canto which was finished after almost three years of preparation.

Written and sung in four languages (English, Italian, French and Spanish), and recorded with a full symphony orchestra, Canto is a collection of eleven songs inspired by Vannelli's love of classical music and opera.

From the subtle power of the title track, “Canto,” (where Vannelli sings of the artistic passion that came over him during a beautiful sunset and which ultimately inspired him to take on the musical adventure that became the album); through "Parole Per Mio Padre" (Vannelli's moving tribute to his late father); to the Broadway-like musical crescendo of “The Last Days of Summer," (with its poignant images of embarking on middle life and memories of care-free days of youth), Canto is not only one man's artistic triumph, it is a brave, new musical statement that Vannelli calls "his album of neo-classical modern pop ballads."

"I think it has been dormant within me for many years," says Vannelli, of the inspiration to create Canto. For Vannelli, who no longer embraces the statue awards and rock memorabilia that document his years as one of Canada's biggest pop stars during the '70s and '80s, the album marks a new beginning. "I have always been an aficionado of classical music. I have always wanted to find a way to blend modern music with the classical idiom…. especially vocally driven classical. Singing in different languages came naturally to me, in the sense that I had been raised in such a pluralistic society, - that is Montreal, Canada."

"We spoke English, French and bits of Italian every day. We didn't speak Spanish, but living in Los Angeles for 14 years helped that situation. As a singer, singing in different languages was both a lesson and liberating experience. In some cases it was a cathartic experience. When singing in a foreign language, you're not as concerned, as with the English language, about pacifying the gatekeepers of cerebral function. With Italian and French and the other romantic languages, the singer finds himself either there, or not there, emotionally, almost immediately."

Canto (both the song and the album) came when Gino Vannelli realized in 2000 that his artistic survival could only be achieved through change and a willingness to pursue music that moved him from within. "As with Italian, the music is all ‘heart on sleeve’," says Vannelli. "I’m a Puccini fan …. a Verdi fan and a lover of French impressionism. I mixed a lot of those elements together to achieve a Mediterranean sound that is soft and passionate. That is, simple melodies woven through a maze of harmony. The words were written to music that already had multi-lingual considerations. It is different from writing music and then just translating it. I wasn’t after composing an English song, that would later be translated into Spanish or another language, resulting in a kind of a musical stepchild."

Vannelli relied on his childhood memories to create the lush arrangements and emotionally powerful songs that became Canto. Vannelli’s late father, who gave up his own career as a cabaret crooner to hold down a steady job so he could raise his growing family, inspired much of the record.

"My father sang to me as a boy, in Italian," remembers Vannelli. "I listened to opera a lot as a child at home and on the radio. I also listened to French radio as a child, because I had French-Canadian friends. All of this came natural to me because I was a Quebec-er." It was his love for opera and classical music, as well as an interest in the classic torch singers of post-World War II France, such as Edith Piaf, that pushed Vannelli toward finding this new and breathtaking musical hybrid.

"I didn't want an album that was translated into any specific language, per se. I wanted a record with songs that were recorded in the language they were was written in. Euphoney, which deals with quality of harmonious sound, played a large part of these songs and this album. Case in point: ‘Mala Luna’ was a very Spanish-type melody. Listen to some of Ravel's Spanish works and you will know what I am talking about. I really wanted to capture that. It's a dark, brooding bravado kind of essence, that classical Spanish music possesses."

The seeds of Canto actually came when Vannelli agreed to produce a Danish jazz pianist named Niels Lan Doky. He contributed an early version of "Parole Per Mio Padre” and agreed to sing it on the record when Lan Doky asked. Eventually, after the Vatican discovered the record, the two did a command Papal performance of the song at a Vatican Christmas Gala in 2000.

"I have no idea how the Pope's representatives from the Vatican heard the record," admits Vannelli, who says his brief time with The Holy Father was truly inspirational. "I was able to meet with him after the performance. He has a charisma about him. You know it when he is holding your hand and whispering in your ear. When you look in his face it is hard to believe he is in his eighties. There is a glow to him. There is something very set and peaceful; there is this luminosity about him."

Upon performing the song for the Pope, BMG Canada approached Vannelli to write and record an entire album of similar music. He jumped at the opportunity and the music just began to flow. He teamed up fellow Canadian, Glenn Morley, who co-produced and co-orchestrated the record with Vannelli, at Gino’s Oregon-based studio. Also involved were renowned orchestrators Don Sebesky and Jorge Calendrelli, (who each contributed orchestrations to one track), as well members of the Northwest Orchestral Assembly who performed on every track. In all, over 30 live musicians and the newest state-of-art computer technology were used in the making of Canto.

The album's first radio track, the English language love ballad, "The Last Dance" was written and produced by Gino Vannelli and his two brothers and longtime collaborators, Joe and Ross Vannelli. In addition, Vannelli worked closely with a team of expert foreign language vocal coaches who helped him write and sing in Italian, Spanish and French.

"As you have musical considerations, you have to have language or phonetic consideration as well, as to whether you are saying the right word. When it got down to perfecting each word of each song, it took a lot of time and a coach who knew how to instruct me on the use of the proper inflection. It's not just a matter of uttering the translated word. I would have to ask the language coaches if I was indeed stressing the right prefix or suffix that would determine the proper meaning of a word. “

Vannelli burst onto to the international music scene at age 21, when he released Powerful People album in 1974, on A&M Records. A single, from the LP “People Gotta Move,” reached the Top 10 and built the foundation for a huge following. Four years, several sold out tours, and three albums later, Vannelli reached #1 on the Billboard Pop Charts in 1978 with the timeless pop classic, "I Just Wanna Stop," from Brother-To-Brother album. The 1980s saw another Top 5 single, “Living Inside Myself”, from the Nightwalker album.

"By the early 1990s I decided to move from Los Angeles to the Northwest. I thought a geographical change would inspire a psychological change. Things just weren’t working. Perhaps a change of place would inspire a change of heart. I wanted to get back into music again. I didn't want to be a marketer or chase trends or chase the pop charts.”

Vannelli settled in Portland, Oregon, which he found to be a thriving artistic community and a great jazz town. “ I made friends with a lot of jazz musicians and recorded an album called Yonder Tree, my own brand of a jazz album. I was really proud of that record. I thought there were some really good songs and performances.”

Yonder Tree did well enough worldwide to inspire and satisfy his loyal following, as well as Vannelli’s own artistic aspirations. “This record helped squelch a malaise I had developed about the music business in the 1980s. I was re-inspired once again.”

Sensing a chance to re-capture his previous pop glory, he wrote and recorded the Slow Love album, which was more R&B and pop driven. "That was pretty much a dismal failure, commercially," he admits. "It was in 1998 and one reason is that one week after I handed it in at PolyGram, the label was sold to Universal. You can't fight that kind of kismet. It just got lost. I do intend to re-record three or four of those songs, someday, however."

"I had to stop and reconsider," recounts Vannelli. "You face a brick wall. I had to decide if the pop world held anything for me, or if I held anything for it. I didn’t know. There was a mismatch of some kind. I didn't feel like giving my all to another venture leading to nowhere."

"It has been a bit of a trick, but I have re-orchestrated all my older material for orchestra," he says. "Sounds good … I like singing it that way. Everything from 'Brother To Brother', to 'Black Cars,' (his 1985 modern music hit). We did that one in a kind of a jazz-ified, orchestral way."

Although, Vannelli will not completely close the door on the successful pop hits of his past, he does feel the need to leave most of the reminders of that former life behind, and move on.

"I like what I am doing now. As far as the future goes, I am working on something new, which is an opera written specifically for animation. The spaces are definitely filled! In the interim, I have developed certain skills doing this record and working with the orchestra. Why not to take it a few steps further?"
RCA red seal Victor.


2 : BIOGRAPHY from The Dinosaurdays SAFM - 11 March 2001 : The artists featured were: April Wine, Blood, Sweat & Tears, IF, Mogul Thrash, Al Stewart, Nite Flyte, Gino Vannelli, Ace, East of Eden, Room...

Gino Vannelli - Appaloosa, from "Brother to Brother" in 1978, his 6th album. Canadian born Vannelli grew
up in Montreal, Quebec. He was born into a musical family, where his father Russ had played in Bix Belair and Maynard Ferguson's bands. Vannelli learnt to play the drums as a child and studied music theory at McGill University. Whilst there, he formed a R 'n B band with his older brother Joe and his other brother Ross subsequently joining them. He recorded his first single, "Gina Bold", under the name of Vann Elli in 1970. It climbed to number 92 in May that year. He later signed to A & M Records and released his first album, "Crazy Life", in 1971. He had to wait three years before enjoying notable success with "Powerful People", in 1974. He went on to record a number of charting singles and albums, one of the best being our featured album, which saw him work with the likes of drummer Mark Craney, bassist Jimmy Haslip, sax player Ernie Watts, brother Joe on keyboards, Carlos Rios on guitar, Manuel Badrena on percussion, Victor Feldman on vibes and Ross Vannelli on background vocals.

The Dinosaursdays SAFM.


3 : Biography for Gino Vannelli

Mini biography :
Gino Vannelli was born in Montreal (Canada).
Helped by her brothers, Joe, an extraordinary pianist, and Ross, an exquisite composer, he experimented with different sounds close to the soul, jazz and the bossa, since his first recording in 1973, Crazy Life, created in Los Angeles, USA.

His most important album is Brother to brother, a complete music repertoire of fusion. Vannelli could have become a star, but he preferred to go on experimenting. Later, he recorded The big dreamers never sleep, Inconsolable man, Yonder tree and Slow love, between others great albums.
IMDb mini-biography by Luis Venosa.

A word from the Editor : See line 2 : "Helped by her" ?????

An e-mail dated 27 June 2005, from the writer who wrote the Gino Vannelli Biography number 3:

To the Editor:

I'm Luis Venosa, author of the biofraphy of Gino Vannelli, hosted in www.imdb.com. Above all, sorry for my bad english. I hope you understand me. I have read your "words" about my comment "helped your brothers", and want to explain

I admire Gino sinde 1974. During the next 2 years, I dont knew not even who was Gino Vannelli, because in Argentina - till 1976 - don't had edite any album of Gino. I dreamed whith the Gino's music, without to know his name. During 2 long years. I searched about Gino even the Canadian Consulate in Argentina; I wrote letters to "address" (Consulate priovide me) and the letter returned by "unknown". I maked all!!!, here, in Argentina, between 1974 and 1976. Till I founded his LP "The gist of gemini" and to be astonished, amazed!!!. Since that moment, Gino is my idol, and my music (I'm a musician too) is ispired in yours, between others. I am the first fan of gino in my country, I can guarantee!!! When said "helped" I used that word because I don't had a better word, but I know what kind of musician is Gino... is the better!!! I'm sorry that he don't had to be in Argentina never (only a play back on TV.... without promotion and fleeting). I still hope your music in my country (with all!!!). Only wanted/ wished to include Gino in the best data base (www.imdb.com), because he merit to be. I'm sorry if I commited a mistake. Thanks.
Luis Venosa, Buenos Aires, Argentina.


4 : Gino Vannelli Biography from Canadian Bands dot com :

The native of Montreal grew up with music in his home, literally. An accomplished big band musician, his father Russ had played with practically every major star of the era, exposing Gino to a wide variety of styles - a trademark of his over 3 decades of songwriting. He was admitted into McGill University in the late 60's to study music theory, having already pretty much mastered every instrument available to him. He dropped out in 1969 to form Vann Elli with older brother Joe, adding youngest brother Ross to the mix a few months later. A loosely constructed r&b outift, they landed a short term deal with RCA and cut the single "Gina Bold" the next year. Though ill-received, the brothers spent the next year and a half on the road before Gino packed up and headed to LA, released from his deal with RCA.

Convinced they had what it took to be stars but just needed the right outlet, they re-did some material they'd written while on the road back home. After peddling the demos to practically every label in town, they finally landed a contract with A&M in '73. Produced by Herb Alpert, co-founder of A&M, Gino's first album was that summer's CRAZY LIFE. Met with indifference, it seemed to lack direction - a horse that bolts out of the gate but didn't know which way to run. Despite the title track and the somewhat autobiographical tale of a man seeking his fame and fortune called "Hollywood Holiday", the record was a failure considering no single was released, Alpert's expectations and the fact he oversaw production, a mandatory stipulation on his part in the deal.

Gino Vannelli shown in an artistic way Gino returned to the LA studios with a different approach. 1974's POWERFUL PEOPLE had more of a dance feel to it and the lead single "People Gotta Move" cashed in on the surging disco market, making it to number 22 on Billboard. The title track was then released, also cracking the top 30 and garnered him a Grammy nomination for best new artist. He also took home that category's award at the following spring's Juno Awards.

1975 showed early signs that Vannelli wasn't one to be 'labelled' into a particular category. STORM AT SUNUP was a definitely more jazz oriented record. Despite three singles charting on Billboard, neither "Love Me Now" or the ballad "Keep On Walking" made it over with the US critics. As leaders of the disco deterioration, they were expecting something to boogie to, not appreciate. A&M execs weren't happy with the unprofitable 'work', so they pressured Gino into selling his soul and returning to the disco-ish formula that raked in so many dollars before. GIST OF THE GEMINI was released the summer of '76. A happy blend of soul-selling and something he could be proud of, the record spawned the dance single "Love Of My Life" and "New Fix For '76" but also tracks like "Prelude To The War" and the soulful "Omens Of Love". A world tour ensued after which Vannelli moved from Hollywood to New Orleans to be away from what was growing to be a creatively-deprived environment. For PAUPER IN PARADISE, released the summer of '77, Gino travelled to England, marking the first co-production with brother Joe. The record pretty much stayed true to Vannelli's fashion of not staying true to ANYTHING. With assistance from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, tracks like "Valleys of Valhalla" and the title song helped mold an 'orchestrated rock opera with a jazz flair' atmosphere, much to the shagrin of the record label.

The brothers returned Stateside, where they hooked up with brother Joe for '78's appropriately titled BROTHER TO BROTHER. A true collaberation, ironically it was Ross' song "I Just Wanna Stop", a sort of power ballad with an infectious groove that charted the highest. A&M still wanted dance/pop oriented run of the mill 'sellers' and the new single gave them just that. Quick to follow up, "Appaloosa" was releasedearly in '79, followed by "Wheels Of Life" and then "The River Must Flow". Despite the record's success, garnering another Grammy nomination and now taking home Junos four consecutive years, there were still differences between where the label wanted Gino's records going, and where he was willing to take them. They parted ways that fall and A&M released THE BEST OF GINO VANNELLI as a standard cow-milking procedure in time for the Christmas rush.

He shopped himself around and landed a deal with Arista, resurfacing in the spring of '81 with NIGHTWALKER. Initially it seemed like a match made in music heaven, with executives allowing Vannelli more freedom than was given with A&M. With his brothers again with him, the record was pivotal in the development of Gino Vannelli the artist. Though it had a definite pop flavour with the singles "Living Inside Myself", reaching #7 and the title track which also cracked the top 30, but others like "Seek and You Shall Find", penned by all 3, and "Stay With Me" showed a growing maturity. Unfortunately tho, his marriage with Arista was short-lived, as there was a new coat of brass in the office and the people handling Vannelli were dumped.

He took a step out of the spotlight, doing production and session work while re-assessing his career and to build his dream studio, Hollywood's Larkfield Sound Studios. He landed a deal with Mercury in the spring of '84 on the condition he produce hits, not just explore his musical dexterity. His most 'produced' album yet was the result of nearly a year in his studio. BLACK CARS was an instant smash, eventually cracking the top 10 by the summer of '85. The re-energized Vannelli was exploring more into production techniques, sticking to a pop formula but with a laid-back Latin feel with the other singles "Hurts To Be In Love" and "Just a Motion Away". Less than a year later he used a cookie cutter approach to release BIG DREAMERS NEVER SLEEP in the summer of '87. The first single "Wild Horses" seemed like a power ballad being restrained, not only making the top 20, but showed off his attention to detail behind the board. Needless to say - Mercury was happy when "Persona Non Grata", "Young Lover" and "In The Name Of Money" all helped make BDNS made it 2 straight gold records for them here in Canada and in Europe, but the American markets all but ignored it.

His next offering was 1990's INCONSOLABLE MAN. A hit with the critics and fans alike, the lead single "Cry Of Love" immediately charted, right ahead of "The Time Of Day" and "If I Should Lose This Love". His return spawned his first world tour in over 12 years. Capping off the celebrations was the LIVE IN MONTREAL album released in early '92 following the tour - a full year and a half after the concert. Gino and Ross both kept busy following the tour with outside projects while recharging his own batteries, including working with acts including Frank Nimsgren, Denmark's Ku Da Sai and fellow Montrealer Martine St Claire, which netted them a top 10 French single "L'Amour Est Loi", a loose interpretation of "Wheels Of Life" from the '78 BROTHER TO BROTHER lp.

YONDER TREE was released in 1995 amid more hype. It possessed a 'for the fans' appeal more so than perhaps anything else Vannelli's ever recorded - although revisiting his jazz roots. "A Little Bit Of Judas" and "Come To The Well" seemed geared not for airplay at all, but for the faithful following that had accompanied him for the last 2 decades plus. YONDER TREE HITS was released shortly after as part of a marketing ploy. It was basically the YONDER TREE album with seven of Gino's hits while still with A&M.

He again retreated to working with other artists, including David Meece and again with Ku Da Sai, coming out of the shadows in 1997 with DUETS, featuring his teaming with such stars as Nimsgren and St Claire, The Yellowjackets, Gianni Bella and The Dorky Brothers. Perhaps more so than any other record, DUETS allowed the Vannelli Brothers creative freedom in the studio, recutting some of Gino's earlier hits, as well as "Christmas Eve", "L'Amour Est Loi" and the new studio song "Tender Lies". His next full studio album would be SLOW LOVE the next year, a sort of emotional journey geared for an adult contemporary audience, with "Lost and Found", "A Woman Crossed With Love" and the title track. He hit the road in support of the album, playing mostly medium sized arenas that year and recorded the show in Montreal - again. LIVE, a 7 track CD, marked Gino's second live record when it hit the stores in 2000, while THE MILLENNIUM COLLECTION nicely summed up the career of one of Canada's most prolific songwriters in 2002. CANTO, released in 2003 and his first new record in nearly 5 years was eagerly awaited by Vannelli's fans and they weren't disappointed. 11 new tracks have thrilled the stronghold of devotees, with the title-track, "The Last Dance" and several Italian pieces reaffirming him as one of Canada's most prolific songwriters/performers.

A word from the Editor : See how they write : Dorky Brothers ??? Nimsgren ??? Why do people make these mistakes ??? A mistake is not that bad but people have to correct it when they receive a note or a warning !!!??? When people write something or create something than they have to do some kind of research, but hey that's our humble opinion !!!
It's Doky Brothers and Frank Nimsgern


5 : 1998 PolyGram Records, Inc. : Gino Vannelli Biography :

A modern master of intimacy and romance, Gino Vannelli is an artist for whom passion and honesty are guiding rules. Vannelli's incredible string of hit recordings, and his renowned gifts as a vocalist, composer, and lyricist place him in a league with the great interpreters of popular song. Throughout his career, Vannelli has explored new modes of expression, from his ground breaking 1970s work with synthesizers to his current recording, Slow Love, which marks a new peak in the singer's evolution.

Following his adventurous Verve Forecast debut, the jazz song cycle Yonder Tree, Vannelli's Slow Love is an album of memorable love songs that showcases his extraordinary vocal talent as well as his brilliant gift for melody and lyrics. Filled with great hooks and melodies, tender ballads and groove-driven tracks, Slow Love establishes Vannelli as a major songwriter/performer for the 1990s.

Vannelli's musical passions and lyrical poetry are on full display throughout, beginning with the title track and continuing on "Lost and Found", "Words Can Kill", "Cry Baby", and "Tierras de Amores y Sombras", which is sung entirely in Spanish. These songs often reflect Vannelli's personal vision of intimacy and love. He stated: "It was inspired by the woman I married. I wanted to broach the subject of feeling worthy or unworthy of someone's love. The songs bare my convictions." A master of romance, drama, and lyrical imagery, Vannelli infuses these themes with the powerful and sensuous vocal performances for which he is renowned.

Slow Love also shows Vannelli's wry sense of humor and lyrical wit in such songs as the anti-life-support message of "Alive by Science", and the funky, down-at-the-heels sass of Down With Love.

To help him realize his artistic vision, Gino was joined by Tom Grant (acoustic piano), Philip Ingram (vocals), David Garibaldi and Graham Lear (drums), Randy Cannon and Randy Porter (piano), among others. In addition, Vannelli also teamed up with symphonic composer and orchestrator Jorge Calandrelli, and acclaimed producers/instrumentalists Louis Biancaniello, Jimmy Haslip (Yellowjackets), George Whitty (Brecker Brothers), and Rachel Z.

Befitting the drama of his music, Vannelli's early career ascended just when he thought all hope of a career in music was lost. Having toured the Canadian provinces with his brother Joe Vannelli and their band, Gino Vannelli and Good Friends, the pair headed to Los Angeles with demo tape in hand, to seek fame and fortune. After being rejected by a string of labels, Vannelli was finally discovered by A&M co-founder, Herb Alpert. "In desperation" recalled Vannelli, "after stopping in a church and wondering if that was the end of the line, I had an idea. I waited at the gates of A&M Records early the next morning with my guitar. After four hours, Herb Alpert came walking across the lot from his office, and I almost ran over him.

Obviously, he was shocked. The guard came running after me - it was chaotic. I think Herb saw that glint in my eye and knew what I was really about, and he let me play a few of my songs (including "Crazy Life", "Mama Coco", and "Powerful People"). As I sang, he just smiled. When I finished, he said 'Okay, let's do it, on one condition - that I produce your first album.' The next day I went home to Montreal with a record deal."

Thus began a fertile relationship with A&M, resulting in a series of top-selling recordings that fused jazz, pop, soul, and funk in a musical vision that featured Vannelli's gorgeous voice and impeccable styling. These early recordings include Crazy Life, and then Powerful People with the hit song, "People Gotta Move". In addition to earning him his first of several Grammy?nominations, Vannelli also used Powerful People to introduce audiences to the innovative textures of the newly invented synthesized keyboard.

"We wanted what we could not afford," laughed Vannelli. "Joe and I were great fans of Ravel, Debussy, and all the great orchestrators. We were also great fans of jazz. While putting our group together, we had bought a Mini Korg synthesizer. We fooled around with its sounds and realized that if we piled their notes on top of each other, we could use them like single horns, as an orchestrator would. That was totally unknown at the time."

Continuing to break boundaries with his band's supercharged, mini-orchestral approach, as well as with his remarkable voice and songwriting ability, Vannelli's next three albums [Storm At Sunup (1975), Gist Of The Gemini (1976), and A Pauper in Paradise (1978)] were met with critical acclaim. Vannelli stated: "I was twenty-one when I recorded Powerful People. It could've used a little paprika on it. I started to get a little more lucid and in control on Storm at Sunup. And I did some of my best lyric writing on Gist of the Gemini, with "Ugly Man" and "Omens of Love", and "Summers of My Life"."

With his long dark hair, dramatic stage presence, and heartfelt lyrics about love and the mysteries of life, Vannelli's stardom in the '70s was accompanied by status as a sex symbol - a role which never distracted Vannelli from achieving his artistic visions and never diminished the power and authenticity of his music.

Vannelli's pursuit of his musical vision eventually led to his 1978 breakthrough commercial triumph, the platinum-selling Brother to Brother, featuring the #1 pop success, "I Just Wanna Stop". Vannelli, along with his brothers Joe and Ross, had by now earned five consecutive Juno awards as Canada's Top Male Vocalist, Producer, and Engineer of the Year, respectively. Gino also received another Grammy?nomination for Best Pop Performance. 1981 heralded Vannelli's most adventurous album to date, Nightwalker, with its incredibly popular single "Living Inside Myself" (and a fourth Grammy?nomination). He followed with the platinum-selling Black Cars in the mid-80s, and then Big Dreamers Never Sleep (recorded at his Blue Moon Studios).

With the pressures success can bring, Vannelli increasingly found that the needs of the heart and spirit outweighed his desire to perform and record. As he toured the world, Vannelli seized any possible opportunity to go off by himself and explore the cultures, philosophies, and theologies of the places he visited. His travels took him into the Peruvian Andes, and to Japan where he spent time in a Zen monastery and "argued with, battled, and questioned the holymen", trying to answer questions regarding the deeper meaning of life. The experience eventually led Vannelli to record Inconsolable Man.

Vannelli's albums and incredible live performances are hallmarks of the last two decades, resulting in his status as one of adult contemporary radio's most enduring and recognizable artists. His legacy of innovative compositions and dynamic performances foreshadowed contemporary adult jazz radio by some twenty years.

As always, Vannelli believes in living and expressing life to its fullest. "I enjoy making music and writing words this way. To be secretive and mysterious is not really my nature. I don't pretend to stand on a mountain top and view the world from where the air is rare. But I do so much have a better perspective of the business, myself and the world after so many years of being in it."

"If you listen to my older records and then Slow Love, you'll see how my approach and techniques have changed. While my nature is inescapable in many ways, what I've tried to do is perfect and polish that and create something even more beautiful." The result is one of Vannelli's finest albums in an already legendary career.


6 : HISTORICA : The Canadian Encyclopedia.
Encyclopedia of Music in Canada. Vannelli, Gino :

Vannelli, Gino. Singer, composer, b Montreal 16 Jun 1952. His father, (Joseph) Russ Vannelli, sang with the Montreal dance bands of trumpeters Bix Belair and Maynard Ferguson. The younger Vannelli played drums as a youth, studying privately, and formed a rhythm and blues band with his brother Joe (b Montreal 28 Dec 1950), a keyboard player. Though Vannelli recorded as early as 1970 (as Vann Elli for RCA), it was not until 1974 that he had his first US and Canadian hit - 'People Gotta Move,' for A & M. This was followed by 'Powerful People' (1975) and 'Love of My Life' (1976), both his own songs.

His recording of 'I Just Wanna Stop' (1978), written by his brother Ross (b Montreal 6 Mar 1956), has been his greatest hit and brought Vannelli a (US) Grammy nomination. He also received Juno Awards in this period as most promising male vocalist of the year (1975) and male vocalist of the year(1976, 1979). His LPs 1973-8 for A & M were also popular: Crazy Life (SP-4395), Powerful People (SP-3630), Storm at Sun Up (SP-4533), The Gist of the Gemini (SP-4596), A Pauper in Paradise (SP-4664, which includes Vannelli's four-part 'symphony' of the same name, recorded in London with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra), and Brother to Brother (SP-4722). Vannelli shared a Juno Award in 1979 with Joe and Ross for the production of his most successful LP, Brother to Brother, which sold more than 100,000 copies in Canada and 1 million in the USA.

Vannelli began touring in Canada and the USA in 1975, initially with an unusual band comprising three synthesizists (Joe among them) and percussion. In 1978, however, he established his home in Los Angeles and did not tour again until 1990. In 1991 he appeared in Canada, the USA, Europe and Japan. He recorded on occasion during this touring hiatus, and had hits in Canada with 'Living Inside Myself' (1981, from Nightwalker, Arista AL-9539), 'Black Cars' and 'Hurts to Be in Love' (1985, from Black Cars, Poly PDS-1-6415), 'Wild Horses' (1987, from Big Dreamers Never Sleep, Poly 831-6001), and 'The Time of Day' (1991, from Inconsolable Man, Poly 843-638, CD and cass). Domestic sales of Black Cars also exceeded 100,000; those of several of his other albums, 50,000.

His early music was ambitious, intense, and flamboyant, but to the extent that his physical appearance and onstage exertions in performance have always been central to his success - he was described as 'Canada's first export sex symbol since Robert Goulet' (Steven Davey, Toronto Star, 25 Nov 1977) - his credibility as a musician has inevitably suffered. His later efforts have been scaled-down, if not quite introspective, and reveal something of Vannelli's avowed, new-found spiritualism.

Author Chantal Gauthier


7 : CANOE your internet network. Shop CANOE.ca
Gino Vannelli biography :

Gino Vannelli is the son of Russ Vannelli, big band musician who played with the likes of Bix Belair and Maynard Ferguson. During his formative years growing up in Montreal, Vannelli played the drums and went to McGill University for music theory.

During this period he formed a band with his brother Joe while brother Ross was added later. Gino and Joe would eventually be signed by RCA Records and put out some less than stellar recordings under the name Vann Elli.

Having toured the Canadian provinces as Gino Vannelli And Good Friends, the pair headed to Los Angeles with demo tape in hand, to seek fame and fortune.

After being rejected by nearly every US record label, Gino waited to ambush A & M Records co-founder Herb Alpert outside the gates of the label's LA offices with his guitar. After about 4 hours Alpert showed up and Vannelli practically ran him over. Following a scuffle with security Alpert realized Vannelli was not a crazed fan and allowed him to audition. Alpert granted Vannelli the record deal under one condition - Alpert had to produce his debut album. Which happened in 1973. The album didn't produce a single and languished in unattended fashion.

His sophomore release, 'Powerful People' on the other hand, was enthusiastically received. 1974, saw the beginnings of the disco era, and the lead off single "People Gotta Move" reached number 22 on Billboard's Hot 100 in October and garnered a Grammy nomination.

At the height of his disco-stud rise to fame, Vannelli took a left turn and released 1975's 'Storm At Sunup' which was pure jazz with a continuous synth injection. A & M got nervous and insisted Vannelli return to the accessible funk and dance material he had previously taken to the top of the charts. Vannelli compromised and released commercially viable singles with enough conceptual material to satisfy his own artistic sense.

Vannelli's fifth album, ' A Pauper In Paradise', mixed classical and pop as the sessions were recorded in London with the help of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

With the release of 'Brother To Brother' in 1978, Vannelli found himself with much sought after hit records in "I Just Wanna Stop", "Appaloosa" and "The Wheels of Life"). The success of the album brought him a Grammy nomination for Best Pop Performance' and major radio airplay. On the concert front, the Brother To Brother' tour played major world venues like Carnegie Hall as well as larger arenas. In Canada, Vannelli, along with his brothers Joe and Ross, had by now earned five consecutive Juno awards as Canada's Top Male Vocalist, Producer, and Engineer Of the Year, respectively. It would also mark the end of his tenure with A&M Records.

Vannelli re-assessed his career and signed on with Arista who released 1981's 'Nightwalker' which further explored the pop genre. The single, "Living Inside Myself", reached number 7 on the Billboard charts. His association with Arista was short lived however due to a house cleaning at the label and Vannelli took another break to once more redefine not only his sound but his look.

In 1985 Vannelli decided to haul out the big production guns by utilizing the studio he had built in the intervening years and run by him and his brother. 'Black Cars' was a contemporary '80's album with serious production values. The album spawned four hit singles including the title track and put Vannelli at the top of the charts and the cover of magazines.

The Vannelli's literally carbon copied the successful 'Black Cars' album on 1987's 'Big Dreamers Never Sleep', but tipped the style more towards Latin and R&B flavors. "Wild Horses" hit the charts as did "Young Lover" and "Persona Non Grata" received major airplay in Canada and Europe, yet the USA had all but ignored it.

With the release of 'Inconsolable Man' in 1990, Vannelli delighted fans everywhere by launching his first world tour in 12 years. As a celebration of this rare occasion a live album was recorded at Le Spectrum in Montreal on November 18, 1990 and released as 'Live In Montreal' in 1992.

Once again, during the lay-off between 'Inconsolable Man' and his next studio recording Vannelli switched musical gears by tuning into his own spirituality and revisiting his jazz influence . The results would be released five years later as 'Yonder Tree'.

Vannelli is promising a commercial comeback once again with 1998's 'Slow Love'.
Thanks to Dejan in Serbia-Montenegro who e-mailed us this biography.


8 : DUTCH : De Oosterpoort in Groningen, Holland, Nederland.
Gino Vannelli 8 Juli 2005 :

Gino Vannelli zal altijd geassocieerd worden met grote hits als "People gotta move", "Hurts to be in love" en "Wild horses". In de jaren zeventig was hij baanbrekend door als een van de eersten (samen met zijn broer) hits te scoren met behulp van een uitgekiende dosis elektronica. Zijn lenige stem en smaakvolle liedjes deden de rest, al kon het natuurlijk ook geen kwaad dat drie van de vier tienermeisjes in die tijd een hevige crush hadden voor Gino. In 2003 verscheen het emotionele album "Canto" waarop hij op smaakvolle wijze jazz, klassieke muziek, pop en rock combineert. Dit jaar verschijnt een nieuwe cd van deze geweldige zanger.

ENGLISH : De Oosterpoort in Groningen, Holland, the Netherlands.
Gino Vannelli the 8th of July 2005 :

Gino Vannelli will always be associated with the big hits like "People Gotta Move", "Hurts To Be In Love" and "Wild Horses". In the 70's He was the pioneer and one of the first (together with His Brother) in scoring hits with the help of a sophisticated dose of electronics. His supple voice and tasteful and elegant songs did the rest, and it did not hurt that 3 out of the 4 teenage girls had a big crush for Gino. In 2003 was the release of the emotional album "Canto" on which He mixes in a very elegant way : jazz, classical music, pop and rock. This year there will be the release of a new cd from this great singer.


9 : Gino Vannelli Bio: by the Canadian musicians info :

Gino Vannelli is the son of Russ Vannelli, big band musician who played with the likes of Bix Belair and Maynard Ferguson. During his formative years growing up in Montreal, Vannelli played the drums and went to McGill University for music theory. During this period he formed a band with his brother Joe while brother Ross was added later. Gino and Joe would eventually be signed by RCA Records and put out some less than stellar recordings under the name Vann Elli. Having toured the Canadian provinces as Gino Vannelli And Good Friends, the pair headed to Los Angeles with demo tape in hand, to seek fame and fortune.

After being rejected by nearly every US record label, Gino waited to ambush A & M Records co-founder Herb Alpert outside the gates of the label's LA offices with his guitar. After about 4 hours Alpert showed up and Vannelli practically ran him over. Following a scuffle with security Alpert realized Vannelli was not a crazed fan and allowed him to audition. Alpert granted Vannelli the record deal under one condition - Alpert had to produce his debut album. Which happened in 1973. The album didn't produce a single and languished in unattended fashion. His sophomore release, 'Powerful People' on the other hand, was enthusiastically received. 1974, saw the beginnings of the disco era, and the lead off single "People Gotta Move" reached number 22 on Billboard's Hot 100 in October and garnered a Grammy nomination. At the height of his disco-stud rise to fame, Vannelli took a left turn and released 1975's 'Storm At Sunup' which was pure jazz with a continuous synth injection. A & M got nervous and insisted Vannelli return to the accessible funk and dance material he had previously taken to the top of the charts. Vannelli compromised and released commercially viable singles with enough conceptual material to satisfy his own artistic sense. Vannelli's fifth album, ' A Pauper In Paradise', mixed classical and pop as the sessions were recorded in London with the help of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. With the release of 'Brother To Brother' in 1978, Vannelli found himself with much sought after hit records in "I Just Wanna Stop", "Appaloosa" and "The Wheels of Life"). The success of the album brought him a Grammy nomination for Best Pop Performance' and major radio airplay. On the concert front, the Brother To Brother' tour played major world venues like Carnegie Hall as well as larger arenas. In Canada, Vannelli, along with his brothers Joe and Ross, had by now earned five consecutive Juno awards as Canada's Top Male Vocalist, Producer, and Engineer Of the Year, respectively. It would also mark the end of his tenure with A&M Records. Vannelli re-assessed his career and signed on with Arista who released 1981's 'Nightwalker' which further explored the pop genre. The single, "Living Inside Myself", reached number 7 on the Billboard charts. His association with Arista was short lived however due to a house cleaning at the label and Vannelli took another break to once more redefine not only his sound but his look.

In 1985 Vannelli decided to haul out the big production guns by utilizing the studio he had built in the intervening years and run by him and his brother. 'Black Cars' was a contemporary '80's album with serious production values. The album spawned four hit singles including the title track and put Vannelli at the top of the charts and the cover of magazines. The Vannelli's literally carbon copied the successful 'Black Cars' album on 1987's 'Big Dreamers Never Sleep', but tipped the style more towards Latin and R&B flavors. "Wild Horses" hit the charts as did "Young Lover" and "Persona Non Grata" received major airplay in Canada and Europe, yet the USA had all but ignored it. With the release of 'Inconsolable Man' in 1990, Vannelli delighted fans everywhere by launching his first world tour in 12 years. As a celebration of this rare occasion a live album was recorded at Le Spectrum in Montreal on November 18, 1990 and released as 'Live In Montreal' in 1992.

Once again, during the lay-off between 'Inconsolable Man' and his next studio recording Vannelli switched musical gears by tuning into his own spirituality and revisiting his jazz influence . The results would be released five years later as 'Yonder Tree'. Vannelli is promising a commercial comeback once again with 1998's 'Slow Love'.

Gino Vannelli - GinoVannelli - Gino Vanelli - Gino Vanneli - Geno Vannelli


10 : BIOGRAPHY Gino Vannelli : by A&M Records dated February 1979.

"The nature of ambition and conquest have at least one common denominator, that being a forward motion. The energy of Ambition drives one forth towards the realization of goals and from these points, even thrusts one forward to new ambitions and new conquests. It's the perpetual power of ambition and the release of conquest, repeated forever - never the same, forever similar - that makes the human world continue on its proper course, giving each individual an identity."

- Harold Kraft, The Book of Motion, 1948 -

A case in point is that of Gino Vannelli: singer, songwriter, musician, arranger, producer, bandleader. Propelled by musical ambitions first realized as a child, Gino has moved forward from ambition to ambition, reached goal to new goal, developing his own standards of quality and progression. It's Gino's own high standards - in part his identity - captured on record and in concert that have opened the door to his soul that so many have looked through, for their enjoyment and enlightenment.

Born in Montreal, the second of three sons, Gino grew up hearing the sounds of the big bands of the Fifties as well as the early stages of rock - the Presley era. As young as age nine, he knew he wanted to be an entertainer and by the time he was twelve, Gino was palying drums with a band called the cobras and a year later, with brother Joe, he formed the Jacksonville Five where the influences of King Curtis, James Brown and the Bar-Kays surfaced. At the age of 16, Gino recorded his first single which quickly entered the Canadian Top Ten.

Ambition led Gino to New York City for a two-year stay as a journeyman songwriter, honing his craft. Upon returning to Montreal, Gino began performing in nightclubs with his own band. Then on a trip to Los Angeles in 1973 he came to the attention of A&M Records, resulting in the debut Gino Vannelli album, CRAZY LIFE, featuring Joe Vannelli on keyboards and Gino on drums. "I was 20 when I made CRAZY LIFE," Gino recalls, "and in retrospect, I'm quite proud of the album. It was a very valid first step and it led to the expansions that showed up on POWERFUL PEOPLE, my second album," which launched "People Gotta Move," Gino's first international hit single.

1975's STORM AT SUNUP, Gino's third album, marked further development in the Vannelli style as Gino and Joe accentuated a stronger commitment to a synthesizer-based sound while fusing musical progression with the advancement in Gino's lyrical content.

THE GIST OF THE GEMINI, Gino's fourth album, released in 1976, marked an emotional period in which Gino's secret desire to bare his soul was abetted by a maturation of his style and the weaving of the textures and excitement of his live performances into an album that marked a broad step in capturing the essence of Gino Vannelli, performer. "I'm especially proud," Gino relates, "because of its consistency and the reality of the lyrics."

In 1977, Gino's inner search for answers, change and progression resulted in A PAUPER IN PARADISE, an album that presented some of the best pop songs he'd ever written and a grande Gino Vannelli tour de force - a four-part symphony performed by the Vannelli band accompanied by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra - an extensive, expressive odyssey within all the magic contained and imagined in the musical sphere that Gino Vannelli is.

Gino's sixth album, BROTHER TO BROTHER, was released in 1978 marking a triumph of the collaboration between Gino, Joe and younger Brother Ross. Gino has written songs like never before and explores new vocal territory, while Joe provides keyboards and synthesizers. Ross contributed two songs. "Love and Emotion" and "I Just Wanna Stop," the album first hit single. It propelled BROTHER TO BROTHER to new horizons of acceptance and sales led to the release of "Wheels Of Life" as the album's second successful single. On the lp, Vannelli diversified his musical palette, with the addition of guitars and bass, and demonstrated his command of R&B and pop idioms. A sense of innocence shines through the project; but it is an innocence made possible by years of composing, recording and performing experience. Reflecting these years of labor, intense ambition and ever-expanding conquest, BROTHER TO BROTHER is a tribute to the spirit of love that is the foundation of Gino's artistry.

As much a concert attraction as a recording artist, the Gino Vannelli concert is an arena for the intense honesty and melodious passion of his music. His commitment to quality sound in live performance is a firm as his commiment to having the best engineering possible on his recordings. (His records have received two BEST Engineering Grammy nominations and they are consistently used by stereo retailers to demonstrate equipment.) When Gino enters the spotlight on stage, it's not just another night on a long tour. "I really don't think of it as a job. I see it as a partaking in the realization of a dream," he says. "The sharing of my dream with a room full of people who want to share it with me. I have to leave the stage feeling I've proven something to myself."

The high standards to which Gino has adhered since the beginning of his career were recently acknowledged with a Grammy nomination for Best Pop Vocal Performance - Male, for "I Just Wanna Stop." With Joe and Ross Vannelli in mind, Gino accounts for some of the feelings on BROTHER TO BROTHER with this thought: "They are incredible people in their musical hearts and minds. Perhaps I could be where I am now without them but I wouldn't be the same person. With six albums under his belt at age 26, Gino Vannelli has a future full of promise and a past full of conquest.

"The goal for me now," he says, "is in the fervor that a man can maintain for all his life."


11 : BIOGRAPHY Gino Vannelli From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, English version.

Gino Vannelli (born June 16, 1952 in Montreal, Quebec) is an Italian-Canadian singer, songwriter, musician and composer.

As a child, Gino's greatest passion was music. Gino began playing percussions at an early age. By the age of 15, Gino revealed his voice and began writing songs. Just out of high school, Gino's first recording contract was signed with RCA. Gino studied Music at McGill University.

After a stint in New York City, Gino and his brothers decided it was time to try the West Coast.

On February 15th, 1975 Gino became the FIRST Italian artist to appear on Soul Train. This was Gino's television debut. Gino's television appearances also include a performance on American Bandstand. Comedy legend, Eugene Levy portrayed Gino on Episode 4 of SCTV/Network 90 in 1981.

Gino Vannelli purposely broke away from the stereotypical role of the 1970's sex symbol by removing himself from the media spotlight. Permission requested to add here: "Gino Vannelli remains married to his wife of twenty five years. Together, they have one son."

Vannelli has released two albums in recent years: "Canto" in 2003 and "These Are the Days" in 2006. Canto aired on CBC TV in Canada. Gino Vannelli was commissioned by the Vatican in Rome, Italy, to perform for Pope John Paul II. Gino's electrifying vocals and music garnered rave reviews from around the world through all aspects of the news media.

Gino lives and works in The Netherlands as well as the United States. Gino successfully continues to tour throughout Europe and around the world, while working on various projects. Gino's music can also be heard on popular European televison and radio commercials. Currently, Gino is also collaborating with Dutch Jazz pianist Michiel Borstlap, on a new CD project. Artists worldwide are encouraged to submit their artwork for the cover of this new CD.

In March 2007, Gino Vannelli performed in Las Vegas to sold out crowds. By request, encore performances were given in May 2007 at the Flamingo Showroom. As of this date, Gino Vannelli will give three free performances (November 2007) in New Orleans, Louisiana. Proceeds will benefit the Hurricane Katrina Fund.

Gino's music is a distinctive combination of his love for philosophy and poetry.

Gino Vannelli is one of the most enduring and captivating legends of the century.

"The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.
Gino Vannelli, the great teacher...inspires by telling, explaining and demonstrating."


12 : Hello my friends, Found on the web this article. have a nice day, Jacques in Paris, France.

BIOGRAPHY Gino Vannelli From the E-Notes website.

Vannelli, Gino - Singer

In the late 1970s pop singer Gino Vannelli was considered a disco sex symbol, with his thick, curly black hair, flashing dark eyes, chest-baring outfits, and a macho attitude. During this period, Vannelli had several top hits, including "I Just Wanna Stop" and "People Gotta Move." However, by the late 1980s this image had grown stale, and through the 1990s Vannelli underwent a spiritual quest that resulted in a new life as well as a new singing style.

One of three sons of Joseph and Delia Vannelli, Gino Vannelli grew up in Montreal, Canada. His father was an aspiring singer who passed on his talent and interest to all three of his boys, but when Vannelli was ten, his father abruptly quit singing to take over the family barbershop business. However, Vannelli continued to hold his own dream of a musical career. He was performing in his own rock band, called the Cobras, by the time he was 12 years old. With his brother Joe he formed another group, which performed Motown-inspired tunes. When he was 16, Vannelli signed briefly with RCA and moved to New York City. He told Pat Colander in a Chicago Tribune article posted on his website, "I used to go back and forth to my home in Montreal. I'd sing with a group for a while and get some money, or I'd get some money from my parents, even tho [sic] it made me feel guilty, and come back to the city and try to write music."

The venture eventually fell through and Vannelli returned to Montreal, although he continued to send out demo tapes. He was rejected by several labels, and was fairly desperate by 1973. One morning, he waited at the gates of A&M Records with his guitar. When executive Herb Alpert showed up, Vannelli ran after him. Vannelli recalled on his website, "The guard came running after met was chaotic. I think Herb saw that glint in my eye and knew what I was really about, and he let me play a few of my songs." Vannelli added, "As I sang, he just smiled. When I finished, he said, 'Okay, let's do it, on one conditionhat I produce your first album.' The next day I went home to Montreal with a record deal."

During the next few years, Vannelli had several hit songs, including "People Gotta Move" in 1974 and "I Just Wanna Stop" on his Brother to Brother album in 1978. He toured as an opening act for Stevie Wonder and Gladys Knight and the Pips, and was nominated several times for a Grammy Award. His brothers also continued their own musical careers, and while Vannelli won five Juno Awards as Canada's top male vocalist, recording engineer, and producer, many of these awards were shared with his brothers Joe and Ross.

During this time Vannelli was widely viewed as a "sex symbol," according to Nicholas Jennings in Maclean's. Jennings noted that Vannelli, "a hairy-chested prince of synthesizer rock and disco pop," drew "thousands of screaming female fans to sold-out concerts across North America."

Vannelli continued to perform into the 1980s. In 1985 he released Black Cars, performing with his brother Joe, who played synthesizer, as well as his brother Ross, who sang backing vocals. Jimmy Haslip of the Yellowjackets played bass, and Mike Miller rounded out the group on guitar. Although David Hiltbrand commented in People that the band provided "taut musical support," he also noted that Vannelli's talent as a crooner was underused on this album. Nevertheless, one track, "Black Cars," went platinum. By that time, however, musical tastes had begun to change and Vannelli's career was on the wane. He was also beginning to tire of his sexy image, which conflicted with his Catholic upbringing. He told Jennings, "The image that I portrayed and my feelings towards women were constantly on trial, and I wound up unhappy and confused." In addition to these conflicts, Vannelli was exhausted from a grueling schedule of touring more than 200 nights a year.

In the late 1980s Vannelli's unhappiness and confusion drove him to embark on a spiritual journey, traveling the world and looking for answers to his questions about the meaning and purpose of his life. He read hundreds of books on spiritual matters and traveled to various spiritual teachers, including Benedictine monks in Big Sur, California, Inca priests in the Peruvian Andes, and Zen monks in Japan. One advisor, a Hindu monk near Malibu, California, advised Vannelli, "What you really need is a good accountant," according to Lee Berton in a Wall Street Journal article posted on Vannelli's website. The advice was timely: Although Vannelli had made millions early in his career, he had managed his money unwisely and was hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt.

In 1991, partly in response to this advice and partly out of a desire to live more simply, Vannelli left Los Angeles, where he had lived for years, and moved with his wife Patricia and their son Anton to a modest home in Portland, Oregon. He paid off his debts and saved enough money to produce a new album.

In 1995 he released Yonder Tree, the jazz-inspired story of his spiritual quest. Vannelli sang with the backing of pianist Randy Porter, bassist Phil Baker, and drummer Graham Lear, as well as several guests, including saxophonist Tom Scott. The album's style is reminiscent of Frank Sinatra in the 1950s, but Vannelli's lyrics take a more personal turn, exploring themes of temptation and desire, and describing his travels in search of spiritual truth. Vannelli told Jennings that with the release of Yonder Tree, he wondered, "Will the public accept me, or can I grow old with them thinking that I'm not good anymore? That's the trap of having been some sort of sex god. And it's very hard to get past that." He also commented, "The album represents the journey I've been on, and this wanting to break through and do something I've always wanted, without being afraid of whether or not I'm going to sell a lot of records."

Vannelli's father, who had once aspired to a musical career but quit because he feared failure, died a few months before the album was released, and Vannelli dedicated the album to him. Indirectly, Vannelli's father had inspired the album, as he was a Sinatra fan and Vannelli had grown up listening to his father's Sinatra classics.

Vannelli followed Yonder Tree with Slow Love, an album of love songs that emphasized melodic ballads as well as Vannelli's personally revealing style of lyric writing. On his website Vannelli wrote that the album "was inspired by the woman I married. I wanted to broach the subject of feeling worthy or unworthy of someone's love. The songs bare my convictions."

For the Record . . . Born on June 16, 1952, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada; son of Joseph and Delia Vannelli; married to Patricia; children: Anton. Education: Studied music theory at McGill University.

Began singing professionally at age 12 in band the Cobras; at 16, signed briefly with RCA; signed with A&M in 1973, released seven albums that included hit singles "People Gotta Move" and "I Just Wanna Stop"; released Nightwalker on Arista, 1981; signed with Mercury and released Black Cars (1985), Big Dreamers Never Sleep (1987), Inconsolable Man (1990), and Live in Montreal 1992; moved to Verve Records and released Yonder Tree (1995) and Slow Love (1998); signed with BMG and released Canto, 2003.

Awards: Juno Award, Canada's Most Promising Male Vocalist, 1975; Juno Award, Male Vocalist of the Year, 1976, Juno Award, Producer of the Year (with brothers Joe and Ross), and Male Vocalist of the Year, 1979; Juno Awards, Recording Engineer of the Year (with brother Joe), 1986, 1987, 1991.

Addresses: Record company: Verve Records, 825 8th Ave., New York, NY 10019, USA. Websites: Gino Vannelli Official Website: http://www.ginov.com and the Official World Fan Website: http://www.ginovannelli.info The singer continued to reinvent himself and his career, and as he approached the age of 50 he began working with a vocal coach in Portland. The coach stripped down Vannelli's style, ridding him of old bad habits and expanding his vocal range. Vannelli also began singing in other languages, expanding his repertoire. He wrote a song in Italian, "Parole Per Mio Padre," dedicated to his father. When executives from BMG Canada heard the song, they offered him a contract, and Vannelli asked his brothers to collaborate with him on the resulting album, Canto (2003), an orchestral pop album that includes songs in French, Italian, Spanish, and English. "It's a coming of age and acceptance for myself," he told Derek Chezzi in Maclean's.

Selected discography
Crazy Life, A&M, 1973.
Powerful People (retitled People Gotta Move), A&M, 1974.
Storm at Sunup, A&M, 1975.
The Gist of the Gemini, A&M, 1976.
A Pauper in Paradise, A&M, 1977.
Brother to Brother, A&M, 1978.
The Best of Gino Vannelli, A&M, 1978.
Nightwalker, Arista, 1981.
Black Cars, Mercury, 1985.
Big Dreamers Never Sleep, Mercury, 1987.
Inconsolable Man, Mercury, 1990.
Live in Montreal, Mercury, 1992.
Yonder Tree, Verve/Mercury, 1995.
Slow Love, Mercury, 1998.
Canto, BMG, 2003.

Sources: Periodicals - Detroit Journal, October 6, 1995. - Maclean's, May 12, 2003, p. 57; June 5, 1995, p. 70. - People, September 10, 1985, p. 22.

Online:
Gino Vannelli Official Website, http://www.ginov.com/ (October 19, 2004).
Gino Vannelli Official Fan Website http://www.ginovannelli.info (1998)
elly Winters
Source: Contemporary Musicians, ©2006 Gale Cengage.

The year is 1979 and those men are the Vannelli Brothers


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